Anna Metcalfe studied English and Related Literature in York before gaining a Masters in Creative Writing at the UEA. She is know working on a PhD thesis in Critical and Creative Writing: a project that is comprised of short stories and essays all in response to an initial endeavour to take Hannah Arendt's 1958 book, The Human Condition, and draw from it a theory of the study of Comparative Literature.

Email: Anna.Metcalfe@uea.ac.uk

 

Julianne Pachico was born in England, grew up in Colombia and graduated from college in Portland, Oregon. She currently lives in Norwich, where she was awarded a studentship for UEA's PhD program in creative and critical writing. Her current work explores representations of violence and loss of human rights. In the past she has lived and worked in Mexico, Ecuador and Indonesia, in fields ranging from microfinance, social justice education and international aid.

Email: Julianne.Pachico@uea.ac.uk 

 

Ayala Prager is currently working towards her PhD in Comparative Literature at University College London. Focusing on the literary representation of post-traumatic mass-violence, Ayala is particularly interested in the ways in which cultural influences come to bear on the processes of death, survival, and bearing witness to trauma. Ayala graduated from Queen Mary, University of London in 2012 with a BA (Hons) in English Literature before continuing on to complete her Master's degree, entitled English: 1850-Present, at King's College London in September 2013. Ayala's research aims to overcome the common criticism of the inherent Eurocentrism in modern trauma theory by analysing and reading cross-cultural responses to mass-violence and genocide conjunctively - her work represents a convergence of Holocaust and Postcolonial studies. By examining the key similarities and differences in the ways in which humans encounter their post-traumatised selves, the worldwide reverberations of mass violence and how genre enables/prevents testimony, Ayala is hoping to cultivate a humanist understanding of trauma that does not rely on the dominant western theories of post-traumatic survival.

Email: ayala.s.prager@gmail.com